Privacy policy

 

How my vendors and I protect you on this site

published:  August 2, 2020
last modified: September 22, 2020

I could’ve done this with some long, drawn-out legalese borrowed from a website designed to create that legalese, but there was no need for it.

My site and I don’t store your personal information—but, just in case I need to be clearer: this site does NOT store your personal information in any way. Period.

That same email address is also where to send any questions about other privacy-related matters for this site.

Notes about external services

Talkyard

This site uses the Talkyard platform for commenting. Logging into your user profile in Talkyard allows you to download your personal data and delete your comments. As an anti-spam and anti-“troll” measure, Talkyard itself briefly tracks each incoming IP address (or IP subnet) and installs a browser cookie. Please refer also to the Talkyard Privacy Policy and see the “Google Fonts” information below.

Google Analytics

Data collected through my former use of Google Analytics was deleted by my request on 2020-08-09. Even when the data was active, I never used it to identify any individual.

Google Fonts

When I learned that the use of Google Fonts served from Google transmit a visitor’s apparently not anonymized IP address1 to Google, I quit using this product (and suggesting to others that they use it) and, instead, served from my own site any typefaces that aren’t part of the so-called “system font stack.”

Please note that the Talkyard commenting platform by default uses Google Fonts; while we have made settings changes that prevent their being used, Talkyard still downloads Google-served CSS that normally accompanies them and, in the developer’s opinion, does transmit the user’s IP address to Google. Talkyard is working on an option to allow site administrators to disable Google Fonts and, when that’s available, we will implement it.

Embedded videos

I no longer embed YouTube or other sites’ videos, since they can and do transmit personal information through cookies. In the two instances where I formerly did—”Some curmudgeonish thoughts” and “Coherence and COVID-19”—I replaced them with clearly identified links to their original locations, and footnoted each link with a reference and link to this privacy policy.

Twitter content

I no longer embed tweets, since they can and do transmit personal information through cookies. I have replaced formerly embedded tweets with just their text content combined with clearly identified links to their original locations, and footnoted each link (or set of links where multiple tweets were quoted, as in the case of “Backtracking to Big G” with a reference and link to this privacy policy.


  1. For the discussion that convinced me to go this route after my initial skepticism about its necessity, see the Google Fonts GitHub issue, “GDPR compliance” (known by many simply by its number, 1495).